LM92 or Metropolitan Chair by Ejner Larsen & Aksel Bender Madsen

LM92 or Metropolitan Chair by Ejner Larsen & Aksel Bender Madsen

The LM92 or Metropolitan Chair by Ejner Larsen & Aksel Bender Madsen was designed in 1949. Carl Hansen and Son have it in production.

The Metropolitan Chair was designed by the duo Ejner Larsen and Aksel Bender Madsen. With its organic form and high quality of craftsmanship the Metropolitan chair falls within the golden era of furniture history, known as Danish Modern.

Larsen and Bender Madsen designed approximately 300 works, and thus put their clear mark on Danish design over the years. Of these the Metropolitan Chair is considered their most significant.

The chair got its breakthrough at the exhibition The Arts of Denmark at the Metropolitan Museum of Arts in New York in 1960, where the most prominent of Danish design was showcased. It was consequently named the Metropolitan Chair.

Metropolitan Chair is produced in solid oak or walnut and is available in two variants: One fully upholstered in saddle leather (LM92), the other combining a leather-upholstered seat with an exposed veneer back (LM92T).

Rocking Chair by Reed Hansuld

Via a post of Core 77 I came across Reed Hansuld a chair designer based in NYC but originating from Canada.

PP52 Chair by Hans Wegner for PP Mobler

As announced a separate post for the PP52 Chair by Hans Wegner for PPMobler

About the PP52/PP62:

This is the most static and classic of all Wegner’s chairs. Its frame is strictly geometrical and the armrests embrace the person seated while the gracious backrest provides state-of-the-art comfort.

In 1978, more than 800 special versions of the pp52 chair were delivered to the DFDS ferry Dana Anglia which was to sail between Denmark and England. This was PP Møbler’s biggest total order to date.

Then in 1982, a customer who wanted to buy a new seat for a pp52 contacted PP Møbler. He needed it for a chair he had found on the beach on the west coast of Denmark. He brought the chair to PP Møbler, and it turned out to be one of the special versions exclusively made for the ferry. The chair had obviously been lost but apparently completed its own journey across the North Sea. So the customer got a new seat, as the chair itself was completely intact.

Later the manager of the ferry company called PP Møbler asking to buy two new chairs for the ferry in replacement of two chairs that had been damaged. Master of Craftsmen Ejnar Pedersen wanted to deliver the two chairs free of charge arguing that the chairs should not break. “No!” said the ferry manager “We really want to buy the chairs. You see, the ferry has been through the most terrible storm while anchored. The entire inventory was completely destroyed, piled up in the back-end of the ferry. It has all been replaced – except your chairs Mr Pedersen. All but 2 chairs were intact!”.

More than 30 years after the ferry’s virgin journey, it has been renamed and upgraded several times and it has sailed on a number of different routes between Denmark, the UK, the Netherlands, Poland, Norway and Sweden. Through all the years, the chairs have remained on board!

pp52’s combined arm- and backrest is made of one piece of solid steam bended wood and two pieces of carved solid wood with joint details of wenge.

pp52 comes with an upholstered seat in either fabric or leather.
pp62 has a plaited seat available in either natural colour or black.

Via PP Mobler

pp911 Slow Chair by Søren Ulrik Petersen

Slow Chair

Slow Chair designed in 2000 by Søren Ulrik Peterson for PP Møbler, who say about him:

His training as cabinet maker and his education the Danish School of Design have been decisive for this reccurrently prize-winning designer. His work is thus characterised by the confident hand of the craftsman, an eye for detail, and thorough knowledge of furniture construction principles. And, simultaneously, his design education steps into character. One senses a generous creative excess in his models. With its focus on functionality and simplicity, this excess points to his anchorage in the Danish design tradition . But also there is the more personal aspect which first and foremost signals a sense of humour and a certain degree of laid back attitude.

Søren Ulrik Petersen started working with PP Møbler in 1998. Just one year later, the result was the arm chair Suppose, which was launched at SE’s exhibition the same year. Since then, Søren Ulrik Petersen has been a regular visitor at the workshop in Allerød at least once a week.

Despite Søren Ulrik Petersens education as cabinet maker back in 1985, it was not until his collaboration with PP Møbler that he ventured working with wood in his designs. The dialogue has since then been characterised by mutual respect where each party benefits from the others professionalism.

His humility and respect for the craft means that Søren Ulrik Petersen always uses the cabinet maker’s knowledge when developing his designs. He never prsents completely finished models, but rather an idea or concept, which is then finished in cooperation with the craftsmen at the workshop. Consequently, the process is dynamic, progressive, and mutually inspiring

Franquin’s armchair by Leblon Delienne – M & O 2017 (04)

Franquin's Armchair

by Leblon Delienne

Leblon Delienne is a French producer of Mainly comic strip oriented figurines. Inspired by André Franquin, a famous Belgian comic strip cartoonist, artists of Leblon Delienne have designed this Franquin chair.