A Miniature Faberge Chair fetched US $ 2.28 Mio

Miniature Faberge Chair 01

In April 2007, at a Sotheby’s Los Angeles auction this stunning miniature Faberge Chair was sold at US $ 2,28 mio.

Miniature Faberge Chair 02

If you are interested in Faberge, check out: Mieks Fabergé Eggs of fellow Dutch woman Annemieke Wintraecken.

Junkyard Clubhouse wrote:

It’s the work of Faberge workmaster Michael Perchin, and is based on furniture designed in 1839 by Leo von Klenze for Tsar Nicholas I for the new Hermitage in St. Petersburg. It’s crafted out of gold and enamel, with the surfaces ground to resemble the grain in mahogany. The front is a removable drawer. Miniature furniture by Faberge is very rare; other similar pieces, including a miniature table and desk, are in the collection of Queen Elisabeth II.

Istanbul 2003 Biennial: A Chair Installation

Doris Salcedo Chair installation at the Istanbul 2003 Biennial

Istanbul 2003 Biennial: A Chair Installation

Recently I visited the 2007 Istanbul Biennial.

While browsing the web and preparing a couple of posts for my other Blog about this visit, I thought I had missed this installation, but now I am assured that these were pictures of the 2003 Istanbul Bienial. Thanks to Pytr75 (alias Belgian Pieter van den Dorpe).

Wearable Chairs: Pret-a-Thonet

Wearable Chairs on the Catwalk: Pret-a-Thonet 00

Argentinean Sculptor and designer Pablo Reinoso has designed the Thoneteando series of sculptured chairs based on old Thonet chair designs which he gave a twist.

Pret-a-Thonet is a metaphor for chairs you can wear or wearable chairs.

Wearable Chairs on the Catwalk: Pret-a-Thonet 01

For the first time they appeared on a catwalk as part of the 2007 Autumn / Winter fashion show of David Delfin.

Wearable Chairs on the Catwalk: Prêt-à-Thonet 02

For the second time they will appear in the presentation of the Spring / Summer Fashion collection of Martin Churba, titled Tropico, on August 21, 2007 in Buenos Aires, Palacio del Correo Central, Samiento 151.

Pablo Reinoso: Thoneteando – Variations on Thonet

Pablo Reinoso
Pablo Reinoso

Thanks to Luis of Mocoloco I came across Pablo Reinoso, an Argentinean sculptor and designer who has designed chairs of his own:

Pablo Reinoso High Chair
Pablo Reinoso High Chair

But for me, and maybe for many others he is more important as the sculptor of Thoneteando, or variations on old Thonet chair designs which he gives a twist:

Thoneteando 1
Rising Thonet ?
Thoneteando 2
Melting Thonet?
Thoneteando 3
Skirted Thonet, or Thonet ‘a la Hawaienne?

Until September 8, 2007 there is an exhibition of the Thoneteando series in Buenos Aires, in Gallerie Ruth Benzacar.

I love it as Thonet afficionado!

Added August 13, 2007

And here a video I found:

What have Balancing Tools to do with Chairs?

Balancing Tools

What have balancing tools to do with chairs?

Balancing Tools

Balancing Tools is a large scale object of art by

Claes Oldenburg (Klahss Old-en-burg) bio:
Claes Oldenburg was born January 28, 1929, in Stockholm, Sweden, but spent most of his childhood in the United States. After studies at Yale University and the Art Institute of Chicago, he moved to New York City in 1956, where he established himself in the early 1960s with a series of installations and performances influenced by his surroundings on the Lower East Side.
Oldenburg’s initial interest in constructing environments such as The Street (1960), The Store (1961), and Bedroom Ensemble (1963) soon evolved into a concentration on single sculptures. Using ordinary, everyday objects as his form of expression, he went on to develop “soft” sculpture and fantastic proposals for civic monuments. In 1969, Oldenburg took up fabrication on a large scale with Lipstick (Ascending) on Caterpillar Tracks, which became a controversial focus for student protest when it was installed on the Yale campus, followed in 1976 by Clothespin for downtown Philadelphia. Since 1976 he has worked in partnership with Coosje van Bruggen. Together they have executed over forty Large-Scale Projects, which have been inserted into various urban surroundings in Europe, Asia, and the United States. Their most recent work is the 144-foot-long, 64-foot-high Cupid’s Span for Rincon Park on the Embarcadero in San Francisco.

Coosje van Bruggen (Koh-shuh vahn Bruh-guhn) bio:
Born in Groningen, the Netherlands, on June 6, 1942, Coosje van Bruggen received a master’s degree in art history from the University of Groningen. From 1967 to 1971 she worked in the curatorial department of the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and was co-editor of the catalogue of Sonsbeek 71, an exhibition of contemporary sculpture held in Park Sonsbeek, Arnhem, and other sites throughout the Netherlands. Van Bruggen was a member of the selection committee for Documenta 7 in Kassel, Germany (1982); a contributor to Artforum (1983-88); and Senior Critic in the Department of Sculpture at Yale University School of Art (1996-97). She has also authored books on Claes Oldenburg’s early work and on John Baldessari, Hanne Darboven, Bruce Nauman, and the architect Frank O. Gehry, among others. Van Bruggen’s first collaboration with Claes Oldenburg was in 1976, when Trowel I, originally shown at Sonsbeek 71, was rebuilt and relocated in the sculpture garden of the Kröller-Müller Museum in Otterlo, the Netherlands. In 1978 van Bruggen moved to New York, where she continued to work with Oldenburg to establish direct contact with a wider audience by creating large-scale, site-specific works in urban settings. Their collaboration has extended to smaller-scale park and garden sculptures as well as to indoor installations.

and chairs?

Balancing Tools was commissioned by German chair manufacturer Vitra International AG. On the photo you see the sculpture against a background of the Vitra Design museum by Canadian Architect Frank Gehry. Vitra itself explains it as follows:

Following a major fire which destroyed a large part of the factory in the 80ies, British architect Nicholas Grimshaw was commissioned to build a new factory hall. His high-tech architecture was considered to be in keeping with the vision of Vitra as an enterprise synonymous with technical excellence. After completing the building, Grimshaw was commissioned to develop a masterplan for the entire site.

This idea of a “Corporate Identity Architecture” was, however, called into question by the “Balancing Tools” sculpture by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen.

“Balancing Tools” triggered off an entirely new architectural concept: Vitra decided to have the buildings on its site on a range of contrasting styles. It commissioned new buildings from different architects, each responsible for a specific need. Vitra’s architectural philosophy is aimed at countering the desolate dreariness associated with traditional trading estates.

I hope the answer is clear:
Two artists / designers (one of whom is a Dutch Lady) make a venerable Chair Manufacturer rethink his policy regarding who to commission as architects for the design of the buildings on its site.
This story makes it clear how much influence design can have.
Finally i would like to add that Het Stedelijk Museum of Amsterdam (Amsterdam Municipal Museum) has a large collection of designer chairs. It even published a book about its collection. So Coosje will know of that collection although her area of interest seems more focused on sculpture.