Marc Newson Lockheed Lounge Chair for sale at Christie’s

Marc Newson Lockheed Lounge Chair
Marc Newson Lockheed Lounge Chair
Photo thanks to Luxist

Luxist, Core 77 and Trendhunter mention this lounge chair to be auctioned at Christie’s for an expected amount of US $ 2,4 mio.
Marc Newson, UK’s Royal Designer for Industry, designed it.

One reader at Luxist comments:

This chair was made famous by Madonna in her 1993 video for the song Rain. A fantastic video that certainly stands up to today’s standards. It was soon after this I saved up to buy my first watch as a kid from ikepod, also designed by the fabulous Marc Newson.

Design Matcher gives the following explanation:

After his graduation in 1984 he staged an exhibition and featured this aluminium chaise longue, the Lockheed Lounge – at the Roslyn Oxley Gallery in Sydney. The sensual, curvaceous shape of the Lockheed Lounge is based on Newson’s vision of a “fluid metallic form, like a giant blob of mercury,” which has become the keystone of his design vocabulary. Named after the American aircraft manufacturer, the chair’s body is covered with nonoverlapping aluminum sheets joined with blind rivets, giving the impression on an airplane body.

Marc Newson’s Biography.

Added Seprember 15, 2007:

Looking further into the Christie’s site I see that this lounge chair is for sale at the London Kingstreet auction of Oktober 14, 2007.

Marc Newson Lockheed Lounge Chair 02

Marc Newson Lockheed Lounge Chair
Photo thanks to Christie’s

I show two pictures as the Christie’s photo seems a better picture of the chair actually on sale.

Christie’s Lotfinder:

Marc Newson (b. 1963)
Lockheed Lounge LC-1
impressed ‘Basecraft Sydney’
aluminium sheets, blind rivets, fibreglass
34½ x 24 x 64½in. (87.5 x 61 x 164cm.)
Designed in 1985, this work is number seven from an edition of ten.
Provenance: Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner in February 1993.

Finally:

On occasion, Christie’s has a direct financial interest in lots consigned for sale which may include guaranteeing a minimum price or making an advance to the consignor that is secured solely by consigned property. This is such a lot. This indicates both in cases where Christie’s holds the financial interest on its own, and in cases where Christie’s has financed all or a part of such interest through a third party. Such third parties generally benefit financially if a guaranteed lot is sold successfully and may incur a loss if the sale is not successful.

Update
The final bid was a bit at the low side of the estimate: UK Pnd 748,500.-

Contemporary Rietveld Utrecht Chair at Christie’s

Rietveld Utrecht Chair

Photo thanks to Christie’s
Italian manufacurer Cassina claims:

Advertising announcement appeared in the “Corriere della Sera” published on 16th March 1972: The text quotes:

“Cassina S.p.A. announces that it has purchased the exclusive reproduction rights for all furniture and objects by Rietveld and by his heirs, resident in Amsterdam. Gerrit T. Rietveld is one of the most significant members of the ”DE STIJL”, the artistic movement born in Holland around 1920 which has given this century ‘s greatest Dutch contribution to figurative art, architecture and design. His work has deeply influenced the european artistic language by setting an original syntax of forms, materials and space”.

This advertising announcement was the crowning point of the complex but pleasant negotiations between Cassina – or more precisely, the Cassina family – and the Rietveld family who were represented at the time by the oldest daughter, Elisabeth, who was assisted by her husband, Dr. Eskes.

The agreement for the purchase of the reproduction rights was consequently signed by the two parties at the Eskes-Rietveld home in Amsterdam, in September 1971, and it is still in force. The necessary consultancy for the initial reconstruction work of the two pieces of furniture under production, the Zig-Zag chair and Red and Blue armchair, in addition to the graphic design of communication instruments, was supplied by Daniele Baroni. The first prototypes were realized at Cassina’s Centro Ricerche e Sviluppo together with G.A. van de Groenekan, Rietveld’s close collaborator. This permitted an interesting comparison between the original construction techniques and the technological know-how of Cassina’s wood craftsmen.

The construction method was later enriched, with Filippo Alison’s help, from the comparison between two different cultures, both of which are involved in the realization of the same objective: the realization, using present day materials and technologies, of design ideas dating back to 1927 through 1935.

The production of the Utrecht model, armchair and sofa designed in 1935, has been started in 1988, to celebrate the centenary of Rietveld’s birth.

Two of these chairs were in auction at Christie’s Amsterdam today.

I am a bit confused as these chair seems very much the same design as th Metz & Co desing of my prior post.

Luckily the firm Design Matcher which has its seat in The Hague (where I live) sheds some light here:

The Utrecht chair was Rietveld’s first upholstered furniture design. Probably he made the chair because the customers of Metz & Co and his own private principals had a need for easy chairs.
The chair was presented by Metz & Co for the first time in the flyer of 1937 with the number R.31 and was lined up in the show house ‘the new home’ in 1937 in The Hague (nr. 267). A 3-seater could be supplied based on this model. After the war the chair was again taken in production by Metz. In a flyer of Metz from 1963 an arm chair, 2-seater and a 3-seater are offered with woolen upholster. The round version, which now is made by Cassina has never been produced by Metz (design date 1936, produced from 1986).

They also point out Rietveld’s clever design idea of the 90 degree angle between the seat and the back and the 90 degree angle between the arm rests and the front legs.

Last edited by gje on October 17, 2010 at 12:18 AM

4 Rietveld Zig Zag Chairs and Table at Christie’s Amsterdam

4 Rietveld Zig Zag Chairs and Table at Christie’s Amsterdam

Photo thanks to Christie’s

This set was designed and made by Gerrit Rietveld for Annie and Carel Bendien, friends of Gerrit. They gave it to a niece where it stayed up to the present day when it was auctioned at Christie’s in Amsterdam.

Rietveld Crate Easy Chairs at Christie’s Amsterdam

Rietveld Crate Easy Chairs at Christie’s Amsterdam

Gerrit Rietveld made these Crate Easy Chairs for his daughter in 1945 and today they were auctioned at Christie’s Amsterdam.

Rietveld Steel Chair at Christie’s Amsterdam

Rietveld Steel Chair at Christie’s Amsterdam

Photo thanks to Christie’s

On May 23rd, 2007 this 1927 Rietveld Steel Chair was also auctioned at Christie’s Amsterdam.

It shows that not only Mart Stam was involved in applying steel rods to chairs, but here the rods were solid as opposed to the hollow tubes Mart applied. The use of plywood was also very innovating in those days.