The Hara Chair by Giorgio Gurioli

Hara Chair White
White Hara Chair
Orange Hara Chair
Orange Hara Chair

I came across this chair while writing about BAD, an Italian Design B&B on my other Blog and didn’t know about its origins until I saw a photo somewhere else.

The Hara Chair
is a 2002 design by Giorgio Gurioli for Kundalini of Italy. It is a bio-energetic seat, handmade in lacquered fiberglass. It is ideal for outdoors thanks to a treatment against ultra-violet rays and the strong resistance of the material to temperature changes. It looks beautiful indoors as well. Available in 4 colors, 2 of which I show here. Dimensions: 31.5″w x 35.5″h x 31.5″d

About Giorgio Gurioli
He began his career as planner and designer for companies such as Motorola, Rockwell, Digital and Teko. He worked with companies manufacturing electro-medical instruments, robotics, etc. He is involved in the design of office furniture. In 1991 he was co-founder of Syn Design. In 1995 he founded Mix Experience. He planned and designed in various sectors amongst which were: Luxo Italia, Out Look Zelco, Martini and Viceversa. In 1987 he was elected for the 14th Golden Compass (Compasso d’Oro) for the design of Filly the folding chair, for the workstation XYZ. At the 1989 Office Design Competition, he won an award with honours. At the 1990 Tecnhotel ADI for his umbrella stand Oyster, at the 16th Compasso d’Oro (Golden Compass) he gained recognition for both the Oyster umbrella stand and his paint gun system Zeus,he was present at the 17th Triennale in Milan with the design of a robot in collaboration with ET Engineering Team, he took part on the Mutant Materials in Contemporary Design show, at the MOMA in New York, in 1995 he was once again called up with Syn Design by the 17th Compasso d’Oro for the book-holder Tra. He is lecturer of Planning and Design Methodology at the ISIA of Faenza.

Via Unica Home

Libeskind Diamond Chair


Photo © Studio Libeskind

As every architect with some self esteem Daniel Libeskind designed a chair. I coined this chair The Diamond Chair, but its official name is Spirit House Chair. It was especially designed for the Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Canada. Libeskind designed a new extension to the museum with the name The Michael Lee-Chin Crystal. I really believed they missed an ad possibility “The Diamond Chair in The Chrystal”, nést pas?

Libeskind Chrystal Chair in ROM
Here is the chair in The Michael Lee-Chin Crystal

Procuction is by Nienkamper… Oops they call the chair the ….. Michael Lee-Chin Crystal.

What do you think?

Fleck Chair

Fleck Chair 1990
Fleck Chair 1990

Fleck Chair’s website is a K.I.S.S. (Keep It Simple and Stupid) website. I love it!

About Fleck Chair:

Fleck Chair began as a simple, one-man upholstery shop known as Fleck Custom Upholstery in the early 1960’s. As time went on and our reputation grew, we began a small line of studio sofas and chairs. Some local manufacturers looked to Fleck Custom Upholstering as a source of seating components. As business grew, employees were added, the number of different products produced increased, and Fleck Custom Upholstering became Fleck Upholstering. Fleck Upholstering moved to its present location in 1975 with a 50 x 100 foot building. At first it seemed very large. By 1978 the large building had shrunk and another 50 x 100 section was added on.

Again as the business grew, sales territory was added, employees were added, and our line of upholstered products increased. Fleck Upholstering became Fleck Chair and business continued to grow.

Cramping again lead to another 80 x 53 sq ft extension in 1986.

Today, we market our products in 19 states under the name of Fleck Chair. Our products are also marketed under various other names and are shipped throughout the United States and to many locations around the world.

Kezu

ABCD 01
ABCD Sofa by Piere Paulin in fabric Momentum
Photo thanks to Artifort

No, I have no commercial interest in this post! I simply am impressed by Kezu‘s website: It is clean, well designed and has a very high usability, even though some parts are in Flash. The Flash items they use are very clever.

Kezu represents inter alia Artifort, a Dutch Firm that in my opinion can learn a thing of two from Kezu’s site.

Why am I ranting about Artifort’s site? Simply because once I wanted to post here about Artifort’s celebration of Pierre Paulin’s 80ieth birthday, 60 years of design and 50 years of designing for Artifort and couldn’t find enough information on Artiforts site that I could easily reproduce here.

Thanks to Kezu I am now able to download high resolution photos.

Artifort took ABCD in production for this celebration. It is a 1968 design of Pierre Paulin, here shown with the the original fabric ‘Momentum’, (designed in 1967 by Jack Larson).

Pierre Paulin Portrait removed

Oops while revisiting Artifort’s site I now see Artifort has changed its site and moved away from its former flash only lay out……like many should do. I hate Flash as it is used on most sites without thinking about the web surfer who wants to get information rather than mere stylish flash presentations of products without details….but even now the Kezu site is my favorite.

Kezu on the ABCD Sofa:

The shape of the ABCD seems to be derived from
an egg carton, powerful, protective and elegant. Its curves look like waves… organic, soft, relaxing yet supportive. The ABCD is available in two sizes, ideal for hotel lobbies and lounges. At the time, Pierre Paulin’s designs were revolutionary, now they have become timeless, an evergreen.

Well, this is the same comment as on the Artifort site.

Kezu on Kezu:

KE-ZU supplies furnitures that makes people feel good. Since its founding in 1992, the company has focused on this singular vision delivering an extensive range of residential and contract furniture that has become synonymous with the way we work and live in today’s better environments.
KE-ZU specialises in the sales, marketing and distribution of high quality residential and contract furniture throughout Australia. We exclusively represent a select portfolio of innovative manufacturers supplying interior and exterior products for residential and commercial projects. Our nationwide distribution network makes available a broad mix of European and locally manufactured products through both contract and retail markets.
KE-ZU is also a major shareholder in Andreu World Pacific – a partnership with Comax Australia and Andreu World s.a. of Spain. This operation imports and stocks significant volumes of unfinished furniture components which are then assembled, stained, foamed and upholstered in Comax’s state-of-the-art factory in Brisbane.
KE-ZU’s strong and intense relationships with manufacturers, distributors and customers combine to maximise our market penetration throughout the region.
Quality focus

Like our customers, KE-ZU is passionate when it comes to quality. We focus on the quality of design and construction, service and performance, lifestyle at work, as well as the quality of the relationships we form with manufacturers and customers.

KE-ZU undertakes a mixture of direct and indirect business through showrooms in Australia and New Zealand. Selected for their ability to exceed our quality benchmarks, we are exclusive agents for the following manufacturers:

Enjoy!

Last edited by gje on April 10, 2011 at 2:42 PM

What have Balancing Tools to do with Chairs?

Balancing Tools

What have balancing tools to do with chairs?

Balancing Tools

Balancing Tools is a large scale object of art by

Claes Oldenburg (Klahss Old-en-burg) bio:
Claes Oldenburg was born January 28, 1929, in Stockholm, Sweden, but spent most of his childhood in the United States. After studies at Yale University and the Art Institute of Chicago, he moved to New York City in 1956, where he established himself in the early 1960s with a series of installations and performances influenced by his surroundings on the Lower East Side.
Oldenburg’s initial interest in constructing environments such as The Street (1960), The Store (1961), and Bedroom Ensemble (1963) soon evolved into a concentration on single sculptures. Using ordinary, everyday objects as his form of expression, he went on to develop “soft” sculpture and fantastic proposals for civic monuments. In 1969, Oldenburg took up fabrication on a large scale with Lipstick (Ascending) on Caterpillar Tracks, which became a controversial focus for student protest when it was installed on the Yale campus, followed in 1976 by Clothespin for downtown Philadelphia. Since 1976 he has worked in partnership with Coosje van Bruggen. Together they have executed over forty Large-Scale Projects, which have been inserted into various urban surroundings in Europe, Asia, and the United States. Their most recent work is the 144-foot-long, 64-foot-high Cupid’s Span for Rincon Park on the Embarcadero in San Francisco.

Coosje van Bruggen (Koh-shuh vahn Bruh-guhn) bio:
Born in Groningen, the Netherlands, on June 6, 1942, Coosje van Bruggen received a master’s degree in art history from the University of Groningen. From 1967 to 1971 she worked in the curatorial department of the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and was co-editor of the catalogue of Sonsbeek 71, an exhibition of contemporary sculpture held in Park Sonsbeek, Arnhem, and other sites throughout the Netherlands. Van Bruggen was a member of the selection committee for Documenta 7 in Kassel, Germany (1982); a contributor to Artforum (1983-88); and Senior Critic in the Department of Sculpture at Yale University School of Art (1996-97). She has also authored books on Claes Oldenburg’s early work and on John Baldessari, Hanne Darboven, Bruce Nauman, and the architect Frank O. Gehry, among others. Van Bruggen’s first collaboration with Claes Oldenburg was in 1976, when Trowel I, originally shown at Sonsbeek 71, was rebuilt and relocated in the sculpture garden of the Kröller-Müller Museum in Otterlo, the Netherlands. In 1978 van Bruggen moved to New York, where she continued to work with Oldenburg to establish direct contact with a wider audience by creating large-scale, site-specific works in urban settings. Their collaboration has extended to smaller-scale park and garden sculptures as well as to indoor installations.

and chairs?

Balancing Tools was commissioned by German chair manufacturer Vitra International AG. On the photo you see the sculpture against a background of the Vitra Design museum by Canadian Architect Frank Gehry. Vitra itself explains it as follows:

Following a major fire which destroyed a large part of the factory in the 80ies, British architect Nicholas Grimshaw was commissioned to build a new factory hall. His high-tech architecture was considered to be in keeping with the vision of Vitra as an enterprise synonymous with technical excellence. After completing the building, Grimshaw was commissioned to develop a masterplan for the entire site.

This idea of a “Corporate Identity Architecture” was, however, called into question by the “Balancing Tools” sculpture by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen.

“Balancing Tools” triggered off an entirely new architectural concept: Vitra decided to have the buildings on its site on a range of contrasting styles. It commissioned new buildings from different architects, each responsible for a specific need. Vitra’s architectural philosophy is aimed at countering the desolate dreariness associated with traditional trading estates.

I hope the answer is clear:
Two artists / designers (one of whom is a Dutch Lady) make a venerable Chair Manufacturer rethink his policy regarding who to commission as architects for the design of the buildings on its site.
This story makes it clear how much influence design can have.
Finally i would like to add that Het Stedelijk Museum of Amsterdam (Amsterdam Municipal Museum) has a large collection of designer chairs. It even published a book about its collection. So Coosje will know of that collection although her area of interest seems more focused on sculpture.