MCesChair by Helmut Palla

All of a sudden this chair came along on Helmut Palla‘s FaceBook timeline where he put it somewhere in 2013. Part Escher (its name is MCesChair, after M.C. Escher), but also part Rietveld this time and maybe Helmut didn’t think of Rietveld’s Steltman Chair. And a bit of Steffen Kehrle as well.

Alessandro Mendini’s Zig Zag Chair

Alessandro Mendini's Zig Zag Chair

Alessandro Mendini's Zig Zag Chair side view

Alessandro Mendini’s take on the Zig Zag chair of Gerrit Rietveld

P Tree Stool by Tanya Aguiñiga

Hah! Trying to feature a char designed by Tanya Aguiñiga….The P Tree Stool is the tenth chair we feature from Tanya…sometimes you tend to forget..

About Tanya Aguiñiga

Tanya Aguiñiga (b. 1978) is a Los Angeles based artist/designer/craftsperson who was raised in Tijuana, Mexico. She holds an MFA in furniture design from Rhode Island School of Design and a BA from San Diego State University. In her formative years she created various collaborative installations with the Border Arts Workshop, an artists’ group that engages the languages of activism and community-based public art. Her current work uses craft as a performative medium to generate dialogues about identity, culture and gender while creating community. This approach has helped Museums and non-profits in the United States and Mexico diversify their audiences by connecting marginalized communities through collaboration.

Sinuous Chair by Noelle Antignano

Via Design Milk I found a couple of chairs designed by students of the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) 2016 design class.

This Sinuous Chair was designed by Noelle Antignano. It has a simple metal frame that is filled with lushy upholstery rolls weaved through it. A bit like Eleonore Nalet‘s Serpentine Chair. See also this post.

PP530 Tub Chair by Hans Wegner

Green Tub Chair by Hans Wegner
Black Tub Chair by Hans Wegner
The green PP530 Tub Chair by Hans Wegner I saw in the Danish Design Museum.
PP Mobler about it:

Conceived in 1954 the Tub Chair was a pioneering experiment, and it turned out to be the most advanced shell chair design Wegner ever did, as the back of the chair is a complicated double bent shell comprising two individual shapes: One that is bent and one that is both bent and twisted.

Even besides the complexity of the back, the Tub Chair is a unique fusion, where Wegner merge the moulded plywood technique with upholstery and traditional work in solid wood and even adding a metal angle adjustment mechanism for the back. It is one of the most striking and brilliant examples of Wegner’s vision and courage, and still it is a most practical, usable and comfortable chair.

However, the Tub Chair was not technically possible to produce in a rational way within the lifetime of Wegner. As our techniques have developed, PP Møbler has been able to produce this great tribute and introduce this bold design in celebration of the 100 years anniversary of Wegner, one of the greatest designers of all times.

The black one I found at the auction site of Phillips where an early model was sold for UK pound 50,000 in October 2015

The Catalogue about it:

The present lot is one of two known period examples of the ‘Tub’ chair, a model which did not enter into wider production during Hans J. Wegner’s lifetime. The chair seat is composed of two pieces of fabric-covered moulded plywood. It rests on a dramatically angled oak base and is supported by a brass mechanism that allows for adjustment of the back angle. Its complexity prohibited fabrication in greater number, though it was included in the 1954 Cabinetmaker’s Guild exhibition in Copenhagen. The chair is a notable example of Wegner’s explorations into the possibilities of plywood, but ultimately the demands of employing both laminate and solid wood construction concurrently were too great and he chose to focus on the latter.

The design of the ‘Tub’ chair shares the intuitive elegance of Wegner’s other furniture, and references certain features of his most well-known chair designs specifically. While structurally more elaborate, the clamshell-form seat relates to the ‘Peacock’ chair (1947) and the forceful forward movement of the base to the ‘Folding’ chair (1949). The ‘Tub’ most closely anticipates Wegner’s ‘Shell’ chair of 1963. It is notable that even a decade after the introduction of the ‘Tub’, the ‘Shell’ form was still considered too radical for its time. It was following the ‘Shell’ chair designs that Wegner closed the chapter on his experiments with plywood. However by 1989 it was picked for the cover of the catalogue for the exhibition celebrating Wegner’s 77th birthday and has since become one of his most iconic masterpieces. The present chair is consequently a rare illustration of some of his earliest career-defining ideas.