Machine Age Armchair by K.E.M. Weber

Machine Age Armchair by KEM Weber aside

Machine Age Armchair by KEM Weber front

via 1stdibs dealer

More about KEM Weber

Architect and designer Kem Weber arrived in the United States in the vanguard of a wave of progressive Central European talents — among them, Rudolph Schindler, Richard Neutra, Paul T. Frankl and Ilonka Karascz — who would profoundly affect the course of modernism in the United States. In his new home, Weber created a wholly American form of modern design that is sleek and stylish, yet comfortable and practical.

Karl Emanuel Martin Weber — “Kem” was his self-styled nom d’usage — was born and trained in Berlin. In 1914, he became an accidental immigrant to the U.S.. Sent to San Francisco by his teacher-turned-employer, architect Bruno Paul, to oversee an installation at a global design expo, Weber was marooned by the outbreak of World War I. But he quickly grew to love California, even if his early years there were difficult. When design commissions were hard to find, he took jobs as a lumberjack, chicken farmer and art school teacher. (He gained U.S. citizenship in 1924.)

In the mid-1920s, while working for the Los Angeles–based Barker Bros. department store — the largest furniture retailer in the country at the time — Weber regularly traveled around the nation to deliver lectures on modernism. His reputation as a champion of a new, clean and elegant style earned him architectural commissions and contracts to design furniture and items such silverware, coffee services and cocktail shakers. His masterpiece is the Airline lounge chair, designed 1934-1935. With its raked, gently angular frame and cantilevered seat, the chair suggests movement, speed and forward progress. Though it seemed perfect for mass production, Weber was never able to convince a major manufacturer to take it on. In the end, fewer than 300 Airline chairs were made. Today, those may be the rarest examples of Weber’s work, but are always worth looking out for. As you will see on these pages, his designs are both intelligent and stylish. They deserve to be a part of any serious collection of American modernism.

Breathe Sofa by Helen Koutouris

Breathe Sofa by Helen Koutouris

Not Only Hollow Chair by Dirk van der Kooij – 2017 Object Rotterdam 03

Not Only Hollow Chair by Dirk van der Kooij

At Studio Dirk Van der Kooij techniques are developed to make a better world.
The chair is created with a completely new, high-tech process. An in-house developed robot melts plastic, into a pipe like shape and then carefully writes out the shape of this chair, somewhat like 3d printing.
Each line is hollow to minimize resources, and the source is 100% recycled synthetics.
The minimalistic shape and the extremely low resolution make the looks of the chair closely related to how it’s made.
It is not only recycled or minimizing resources, it’s not only a newly developed 3d printing process, it is not only a catchy design piece…
The true beauty lies in the combination of it all…

Quoted from Dirk van der Kooij

Rag Chair by Tejo Remy – 2017 Object Rotterdam 02

The rag chair is part of an exhibition of 100 plus chairs, curated by Workshop of Wonders to celebrate 100 years of Dutch Chair Design in the machineroom of SS Rotterdam. I’ve made some photo’s there and will share them with you. It is designed by Tejo Remy in 1991, but from their site it appears the design is also by Rene Veenhuizen.

The grey chair in the background is the V.I.P. chair, designed by Marcel Wanders in 2000.

True Colors Stool by Visser & Meijwaard – 2017 Object Rotterdam 01


True Colors Stool by Visser & Meijwaard

About True Colors

Inspired by the quality of industrial PVC cloth, Visser & Meijwaard developed Truecolors. The collection consists of a series of benches, stools and cabinets made from this strong cloth.

About Visser & Meijwaard

Visser & Meijwaard is a design studio by Steven Visser (1985) and Vera Meijwaard (1988) founded in 2013 in Arnhem, The Netherlands. The designer duo creates distinct but minimalistic products of which versatile materials and clear shapes constitute the essence. In their designs they are guided by distinctive details and the way in which the product is constructed. From the archetypical gym buck to the super functional camping closet, Visser and Meijwaard use their characteristic features and find new ways to apply them.

Visser and Meijwaard met in 2008 at ArtEZ Institute of the Arts in Arnhem. During their studies they specialized in Product Design. After they graduated in July 2012, he with a collection of gentleman’s accessories, she with a collection of very feminine high heels, the idea arose to start a label together.

via Visser&Meijwaard

About Object Rotterdam

2017 Object Rotterdam is an exhibition of Dutch Design in SS Rotterdam, Netherlands, February 10. 11 and 12, 2017


On board of the SS Rotterdam: