Daydream Lounger by Assaf Israel’s Studio Joynout

DAYDREAM-BY-ASSAF-ISRAEL

GREEN-DAYDREAM-BY-ASSAF-ISRAEL

RED-DAYDREAM-BY-ASSAF-ISRAEL

Daydream Lounger

Daydream Lounger inspired by the Lemniscate, which is an endless form looking like an 8.
The lounger consists of two interlocking cushioned panels and can seat 2. It will be shown in Milan in April.

Via Contemporist

Joynout studio, based in Tel Aviv and Milan, specializes in the creation of new products and concepts for contract and public spaces. We give design services and consultancy for furniture companies and architecture firms, while producing our own creations in Italy.

Joynout was founded in 2012 by Assaf Israel, who holds a bachelor’s degree in Industrial Design from the Bezalel Academy of Art & Design in Jerusalem, Israel. The values that guide us in the design process are innovation, quality, user experience and spreading joy.

Via Joynout

Branched and Rooted Chairs by Pontus Willfors


Pontus Willfors

Swedish Artist Pontus Willfors is based in California and had an exhibition at Edward Cella Art & Architecture Gallery in Culver City “Homeland” in June 2015. There he showed inter alia his “Chairs” that he gave branches and roots.

Via Archiscene

Pontus Willfors challenges the way the viewer perceives everyday objects. He examines aspects of nature that are viewed by our society as product, nuisance or waste. Through mostly sculptural exercises he addresses the power of our culture and its ability to manipulate nature and shape its surroundings.

He has shown his work throughout the continental U.S. including Ben Maltz Gallery at Otis in Los Angeles, Irvine Fine Arts Center, Read Contemporary in Dallas and was part of the curatorial show at Art Miami in 2012.

Pontus Willfors graduated from CalArts (Valencia, CA) in 2009 and has lived and worked in Los Angeles since 2005.

via Pontus Willfors

Stacked Scrapped Wood Stool by Piet Hein Eek

Stacked Scrapped Wood Stool
Stacked Scrapped Wood Stool 2

Piet Hein eek designed this stool in 1999. I took the photo in his studio in Eindhoven some time ago.

Machine Age Armchair by K.E.M. Weber

Machine Age Armchair by KEM Weber aside

Machine Age Armchair by KEM Weber front

via 1stdibs dealer

More about KEM Weber

Architect and designer Kem Weber arrived in the United States in the vanguard of a wave of progressive Central European talents — among them, Rudolph Schindler, Richard Neutra, Paul T. Frankl and Ilonka Karascz — who would profoundly affect the course of modernism in the United States. In his new home, Weber created a wholly American form of modern design that is sleek and stylish, yet comfortable and practical.

Karl Emanuel Martin Weber — “Kem” was his self-styled nom d’usage — was born and trained in Berlin. In 1914, he became an accidental immigrant to the U.S.. Sent to San Francisco by his teacher-turned-employer, architect Bruno Paul, to oversee an installation at a global design expo, Weber was marooned by the outbreak of World War I. But he quickly grew to love California, even if his early years there were difficult. When design commissions were hard to find, he took jobs as a lumberjack, chicken farmer and art school teacher. (He gained U.S. citizenship in 1924.)

In the mid-1920s, while working for the Los Angeles–based Barker Bros. department store — the largest furniture retailer in the country at the time — Weber regularly traveled around the nation to deliver lectures on modernism. His reputation as a champion of a new, clean and elegant style earned him architectural commissions and contracts to design furniture and items such silverware, coffee services and cocktail shakers. His masterpiece is the Airline lounge chair, designed 1934-1935. With its raked, gently angular frame and cantilevered seat, the chair suggests movement, speed and forward progress. Though it seemed perfect for mass production, Weber was never able to convince a major manufacturer to take it on. In the end, fewer than 300 Airline chairs were made. Today, those may be the rarest examples of Weber’s work, but are always worth looking out for. As you will see on these pages, his designs are both intelligent and stylish. They deserve to be a part of any serious collection of American modernism.

Breathe Sofa by Helen Koutouris

Breathe Sofa by Helen Koutouris