Chubby Stool by Allain Gilles

Cubby Stool

Chubby Stool by Allain Gilles for Verreum.

The idea behind the “Chubby Stool” was to create a piece in glass which conveyed a real warmth and which could really be comfortable. Hence its generous forms and friendly curves.

The outer shape of the stool is like the revolved curve of an iconic milk stool. So the Chubby stool plays on an iconic shape while using unusual material combination for a stool.

The combination of the fabric and glass creates an unexpected feeling since these two materials are never used together in a single product. Glass has never been a material to be upholstered but now it has been – for the very first time, by our reckoning. In this case, the mirrored glass base will reflect the surrounding room, but also partly the fabric of the upholstered top.

The upholstered foam will generate a warm feeling but also protect the stool in case it happens to fall over.

Chair by Saul Steinberg for Flair

Chair by Saul Steinberg for Flair

Saul Steinberg was born in Romania and studied in Bucharest and Milan. Architecture was among his studies. He specialized in Photo-drawings hybrids. These hybrid photo-drawings come in two forms: photographs (and occasionally old engravings) whose original subjects—furniture, appliances, street excavations, crumbled paper—take on new identities through the addition of drawn lines; and drawings on furniture, objects, sidewalks, or buildings, which were then photographed to record their new mutations.

Steinberg created the first of these photoworks for the short-lived magazine Flair, where they appeared as inset booklets in two issues.

Via Saul Steinberg Foundation

Ou Bien by Wendy Andreu

Ou Bien by Wendy Andreu

I made this armchair during my studies of metal craftsmanship in Ecole Boulle, Paris. This armchair owns four seats. The structure can be turned to reach the next seat. The concept behind this project was to give two aspects of CHOICE: being able to choose your seat but getting always the same! It is about illusion of possibility and real possibility. But actually, all the seats are different from each others: the leather crosses own different patterns. This difference is very subtle and cannot be seen at first glance.

Armchair by Richard Riemerschmid

Via Wright Auction

Richard Riemerschmid (20 June 1868 – 13 April 1957) was a German architect, painter, designer and city planner from Munich. He was a major figure in Jugendstil, the German form of Art Nouveau, and a founder of architecture in the style. A founder member of both the Vereinigte Werkstätte für Kunst im Handwerk (United Workshops for Art in Handcrafts) and the Deutscher Werkbund and the director of art and design institutions in Munich and Cologne, he prized craftsmanship but also pioneered machine production of artistically designed objects.

Source Wikipedia

Merlot Chair by Marta Del Valle Hernandez.


I got a tip about this chair by a friend, Susie Murphy Hemsworth, an Irish girl living in Paris who – like me – has (or had) a single subject blog, not about chairs, but about tables.

The Merlot chair is designed by Marta Del Valle Hernandez.

Marta del Valle is an interior & product designer with a unusual profile. She was previously devoted to the world of animated movies, so sensitivity for both art and color are always reflected in her work. She likes to create spaces that are fun to live, and if possible, fresh and timeless (like good music).

She spent her childhood in the coast of Granada (Andalusia), and since little got immersed in her father’s architecture (Jesús del Valle) and the colourful surroundings. Nothing can make her happier than taking action in a creative process, no matter what it is… from hand painted sheets for a newborn, to an interior design for a dentist. Therefore she has always tried to participate in all kinds of projects.

At the moment she works and continues to grow as a professional with her father, but her dream is to work with a company of young creatives in the big city.

Via Design Daily.