60 th Anniversary of the Spanish Chair by Børge Mogensen

 

Special Edition of The Spanish Chair

On occasion of the 60th anniversary of the Spanish Chair by Børge Mogensen, Fredericia launches a special edition in solid oak combined with
an elegant Olive Green saddle leather. To honour Børge Mogensen’s work, Fredericia searched the master’s archive and discovered this subtle, natural colour, which was one of his most loved hues and one of the dominating interior colours at the time.

Now, and for the first time ever, the Spanish Chair is available in this modern mid-century color marking 60 years of impeccable craftsmanship and cutting edge design.

Available for a short period only: 19 September – 31 December 2018 The Spanish Chair 60 years special edition is available from 19 September, which is the exact day when the chair originally was presented to the world in 1958 as part of the yearly exhibition curated by Copenhagen Cabinetmakers’ Guild.

RRP incl. VAT: EUR 4.370,- / DKK 31.050,- / NOK 38.798,- / SEK 38798
W/D/H/SH (cm): 82,5 / 60 / 67 / 33
Weight (kg): 12

Frame: Solid oak, soaped

Upholstery: Saddle leather / 100% vegetable tanned / mid-century modern olive green

Interview with Rasmus Mogensen:

To celebrate this special anniversary, Fredericia invited Børge Mogensen’s grandson, renowned fashion photographer Rasmus Mogensen, to portrait himself with the masterpiece created by his granddad in 1958.

Give us a few highlights about yourself – what do you do, where do you live etc.?

I’ve lived in Paris since I was 21 years old so a total of 23 years so far. I dreamt of becoming a photographer ever since I was eight years old and did photography at school. I don’t believe that I have a special talent, but I’ve just been able to work my way up to a certain level. Because of my Danish cultural heritage, I’ve had a certain style that I’ve carried with me. Whether that’s good or bad is for others to say. A cultural heritage like that can also be a millstone around your neck when you think you know what’s beautiful and what’s ugly.This is something that I’m struggling with a great deal at the moment. To avoid being a perfectionist in a world which is so obviously not perfect and make room for some heart, for chaos.I grew up in a fairly chaotic family and as a boy I enjoyed having a framework into which I could put the world; putting things in order, straight lines, clean compositions etc.

One morning about eight years ago, one of my assistants told me that he’d reviewed hundreds of my photos and there was not a single horizontal or vertical line that was not dead straight to the millimetre and completely parallel to the edge of the image, not one. This observation came back to me when I saw a film about Børge Mogensen in which his obsessive approach to what I’ve always believed to be a very simple chair – the J 39 – became clear. His perfectionist obsession with a simplistic overall look, the fine details, the perfectly conceived angles etc. both drove and exhausted him.
Just then I felt a special bond with Børge, even a kind of curse. This deep-felt need for absolute simplicity and an idea of creating something perfect. I’m pretty sure that this persistent quest for something which basically doesn’t exist here on Earth has been a contributing factor to my grandfather’s frustration and ferocity.

What impact has Børge Mogensen had on your life – both personally and professionally?

I feel that Børge and everything he achieved affects many generations in a family for good and bad. Without going into too much
detail, let’s just say that with his genius came some darkness and this darkness also affected my life in many ways. But Børge
also added much that was beautiful, a great deal of culture and a great deal of quality.

Børge Mogensen’s designs are characterised by functionality, clean lines and natural materials – and always take their starting point in the whole person. How do you relate to it in your job?

My job, or rather my passion, is to create illusions, to create a reality on paper which doesn’t necessarily exist. To give my views on what’s in front of my camera, be it a beautiful woman, a child, a chair, anything. Børge’s job, or passion, was to create something very specific on the basis of something that originated in his mind. The difference between his and my work is that in what I do, you have to ‘just’ look while Børge’s products need to be looked at and actually used, sat on, eaten at, moved around.
Two very different things and still the same in many ways.

What role does design play in your everyday life?

Design plays an important role in my daily life. I love going home and using my home, sitting in my furniture, letting my hand
glide over the wooden top of my dining table and enjoying the thought that it stood there long before I was born and will still be
here long after I’ve gone if I treat it well. Quality has to go hand in hand with design for everything to make sense. This is the
case in the works of most of the great Danish masters. That is something you can only be proud of.

How have you designed your home?

We live in a house south of Paris which we have designed in an eclectic style with inspiration from Scandinavia, France and the United States. The floors are partly covered in oak herringbone parquet and partly in tiles à la Versailles in the hallway and tiles à la Miami Beach in the conservatory.
The walls in the house are painted in matt colours from Farrow and Ball in different shades of blue and white which create a bright and welcoming atmosphere and extend from the hallway to the bedrooms and on to the kitchen and all the way out into the conservatory. The white walls in the house will probably end up being hidden behind various wallpapers, but we’re going to live with it for a while and let things develop slowly and organically.
Otherwise, our home is decorated with Børge’s No1 sofa in blue, a set of Spanish Chairs in natural leather and other Danish classics. All in an eclectic mixture with a few Ikea cabinets and a bed or two.

The Spanish Chair celebrates his 60th anniversary this year – what would you like to say about it on this occasion?

The Spanish Chair arouses a great many fond memories from my own home, but also from numerous visits to my grandmother’s house. The Spanish Chair has always stood here and every time I sat in it, I thought about Børge, his elevated ideals and how important using his work to make others happy was to him. In addition to being beautiful and different to many other chairs, it is also incredibly comfortable and practical – there was always space on the armrest for a glass of apple juice
and a small plate of something tasty.
I was very surprised at the anniversary chair when I saw it and I think it’s really beautiful. The light wood and the green leather
are really harmonious and modern.
The Spanish Chair is what it is. I love the way in which the leather is stretched on like a saddle and I love to hate its squeaking when I meditate in it in the morning. But what I love most about it is that it lasts forever, and that my children’s children and their hildren will one day be able to enjoy it.

What memories do you have of the Spanish Chair and other Børge Mogensen furniture designs?

Børge Mogensen’s Spoke-back sofa was used for much more than just sitting in! We would turn it to the wall and it immediately became a prison in the game we were playing. Or we would put the side panel right down to the floor to make it into a kind of ramp – I remember cycling up it on my bike (but my mother did draw the line there). The sofa is still there and is yet another testament to the very high quality of my grandfather’s furniture as it has survived both my sister and me and several generations
of my grandmother’s dogs who were all – bizarrely enough – called Sniff.

Long live Sniff!

PP530 Tub Chair by Hans Wegner

Green Tub Chair by Hans Wegner
Black Tub Chair by Hans Wegner
The green PP530 Tub Chair by Hans Wegner I saw in the Design Museum Danmark in Kopenhagen.
PP Mobler about it:

Conceived in 1954 the Tub Chair was a pioneering experiment, and it turned out to be the most advanced shell chair design Wegner ever did, as the back of the chair is a complicated double bent shell comprising two individual shapes: One that is bent and one that is both bent and twisted.

Even besides the complexity of the back, the Tub Chair is a unique fusion, where Wegner merge the moulded plywood technique with upholstery and traditional work in solid wood and even adding a metal angle adjustment mechanism for the back. It is one of the most striking and brilliant examples of Wegner’s vision and courage, and still it is a most practical, usable and comfortable chair.

However, the Tub Chair was not technically possible to produce in a rational way within the lifetime of Wegner. As our techniques have developed, PP Møbler has been able to produce this great tribute and introduce this bold design in celebration of the 100 years anniversary of Wegner, one of the greatest designers of all times.

The black one I found at the auction site of Phillips where an early model was sold for UK pound 50,000 in October 2015

The Catalogue about it:

The present lot is one of two known period examples of the ‘Tub’ chair, a model which did not enter into wider production during Hans J. Wegner’s lifetime. The chair seat is composed of two pieces of fabric-covered moulded plywood. It rests on a dramatically angled oak base and is supported by a brass mechanism that allows for adjustment of the back angle. Its complexity prohibited fabrication in greater number, though it was included in the 1954 Cabinetmaker’s Guild exhibition in Copenhagen. The chair is a notable example of Wegner’s explorations into the possibilities of plywood, but ultimately the demands of employing both laminate and solid wood construction concurrently were too great and he chose to focus on the latter.

The design of the ‘Tub’ chair shares the intuitive elegance of Wegner’s other furniture, and references certain features of his most well-known chair designs specifically. While structurally more elaborate, the clamshell-form seat relates to the ‘Peacock’ chair (1947) and the forceful forward movement of the base to the ‘Folding’ chair (1949). The ‘Tub’ most closely anticipates Wegner’s ‘Shell’ chair of 1963. It is notable that even a decade after the introduction of the ‘Tub’, the ‘Shell’ form was still considered too radical for its time. It was following the ‘Shell’ chair designs that Wegner closed the chapter on his experiments with plywood. However by 1989 it was picked for the cover of the catalogue for the exhibition celebrating Wegner’s 77th birthday and has since become one of his most iconic masterpieces. The present chair is consequently a rare illustration of some of his earliest career-defining ideas.

True Colors Stool by Visser & Meijwaard – 2017 Object Rotterdam 01


True Colors Stool by Visser & Meijwaard

About True Colors

Inspired by the quality of industrial PVC cloth, Visser & Meijwaard developed Truecolors. The collection consists of a series of benches, stools and cabinets made from this strong cloth.

About Visser & Meijwaard

Visser & Meijwaard is a design studio by Steven Visser (1985) and Vera Meijwaard (1988) founded in 2013 in Arnhem, The Netherlands. The designer duo creates distinct but minimalistic products of which versatile materials and clear shapes constitute the essence. In their designs they are guided by distinctive details and the way in which the product is constructed. From the archetypical gym buck to the super functional camping closet, Visser and Meijwaard use their characteristic features and find new ways to apply them.

Visser and Meijwaard met in 2008 at ArtEZ Institute of the Arts in Arnhem. During their studies they specialized in Product Design. After they graduated in July 2012, he with a collection of gentleman’s accessories, she with a collection of very feminine high heels, the idea arose to start a label together.

via Visser&Meijwaard

About Object Rotterdam

2017 Object Rotterdam is an exhibition of Dutch Design in SS Rotterdam, Netherlands, February 10. 11 and 12, 2017


On board of the SS Rotterdam:

Green Chair Sculpture

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Green Chair Sculpture
Found this armchair Sculpture in The Hague where I live. Will give you more details whenever I find them.

Green K.E.M. Weber Chairs

Green K.E.M. Weber Chairs front

Green K.E.M. Weber Chairs

Green K.E.M. Weber Chairs

A set of six Art Deco armchairs from the “Kem Weber Group” dining suite by Kem Weber for Grand Rapids Chair Company. These chairs are in Weber’s signature “streamlined” style and are displayed in such museums as the Art Institute of Chicago and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, among others.

Kem Weber was born Karl Emanuel Martin Weber in Berlin in 1889. He received his design training in Potsdam and Berlin and eventually ended up in San Francisco in 1915; he became a U.S. citizen in 1924 and adopted the first name Kem. His designs typified the ideal elements of the “streamlined” Art Deco aesthetic and are considered some of the best examples of this style. Kem Weber died in 1963; his works have been included in exhibitions and museum collections around the world.

This set was also featured in “Horsefeathers”, a film by Groucho Marx circa 1934. KEM Webber was commissioned to design custom furniture for several Marx Bros. films.
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Iconic Art Deco Kem Weber Group Set of Six Dining Chairs thumbnail 1

TITLE: Iconic Art Deco Kem Weber Group Set of Six Dining Chairs
PRICE: $150,000
CREATOR: KEM Weber (Designer)
COUNTRY: USA
CREATION DATE: 1928-29
MATERIALS: wood, textile
CONDITION: Good
LENGTH: 21 in. (53 cm)
DEPTH: 23 in. (58 cm)
HEIGHT: 41 in. (104 cm)
SEAT HEIGHT: 19 in. (48 cm)
DEALER LOCATION: New York City, NY
NUMBER OF ITEMS: 6
REFERENCE NUMBER: 11103188931508

Via 1stdibs.